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Long NameConcomitant Medication NCI Standard Template
DefinitionThe collection of CDEs used in the concomitant medication module.
ContextcaBIG
Protocol Long NameNCI Standard Template Forms
WorkflowRELEASED
TypeCRF
Public ID2867231
Version1.0
Module Long NameModule InstructionsQuestionCDECDE Public IDCDE VersionValue Domain Data TypeValue Domain Unit of MeasureDisplay FormatValid ValueForm Value Meaning TextForm Value Meaning Desc.
Conditional Concomitant Medication Questions There are business rules to indicate situations under which these elements should be used on a case report form
Concomitant Agent NameConcomitant Agent Name21797772.0ALPHANUMERIC
Optional Concomitant Medication QuestionsThere is no requirement for inclusion of these elements on the case report form. If the design and scientific questions posed in the study dictate the need to collect this type of data, these elements should be included.
Agent CodeAgent NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services Code28672471.0CHARACTER
IngredientIngredient Name28716521.0CHARACTER
FormulationAgent Formulation Descriptive Text21796181.0ALPHANUMERIC
SachetSachet Dosing UnitA dosing unit that contains a solid pharmaceutical preparation in the form of a small packet or bag made from a flexible, often porous material.
CapletCapletCaplet
CapsuleCapsuleA solid pharmaceutical dosage form that contains medicinal agent within either a hard or soft soluble container or shell, usually used for the oral administration of medicine. The shells are made of a suitable form of gelatin or other substance.
Capsule/Liquid-filledCapsule/Liquid-filledCapsule/Liquid-filled
Capsule/Micronized PowderCapsule/Micronized PowderCapsule/Micronized Powder
CartridgeCartridgeCartridge
CreamCreamA semisolid emulsion of either the oil-in-water or the water-in-oil type, ordinarily intended for topical use.|On-line Medical Dictionary
DepotDepotDepot
DeviceDeviceDevice
InjectionInjectionInjection
LiquidLiquidA substance in the fluid state of matter having no fixed shape but a fixed volume.
LotionLotionA liquid preparation for bathing the skin, or an injured or diseased part, either for a medicinal purpose, or for improving its appearance.|On-line Medical Dictionary
OintmentOintmentOintment
PatchPatchPatch
PowderPowderA solid substance in the form of tiny loose particles; a solid that has been pulverized.
TabletTabletTablet
FrequencyAdministration Schedule Term Name20033224.0CHARACTER
2 times/weekTwice a WeekTwice a Week
3 times/weekThree Times a WeekThree times a week
acBefore mealsPrior to ingestion of food.
bidTwice a DayDefinition not available.
BiwTwice a WeekTwice a week
pcAfter MealsAfter the ingestion of food.
PRNAs NeededAs Needed
q12hEvery twelve hoursNo value exists.
q1hEvery one hourEvery one hour
q2dEvery two daysEvery two days
q2hEvery two hoursNo value exists.
q2wkEvery two weeksEvery two weeks
q3dEvery three daysOnce every three days. (NCI)
q3hEvery Three HoursEvery three hours.
q4hEvery Four HoursEvery four hours.
q6hEvery Six HoursEvery six hours.
q8hEvery Eight HoursEvery eight hours.
qamEvery MorningEvery morning.
qdDailyOccurring or done each day.
qd x3Once a day for 3 daysOnce a day for 3 days
qd x4Every day for 4 daysEvery day for 4 days
qd x5Once a day for 5 daysOnce a day for 5 days
qhsEvery NightEvery night
qidFour Times DailyFour times per day. (NCI)
qmonthMonthlyEvery month
qodEvery Other DayEvery other day.
qwkWeeklyEvery week.
tidThree Times DailyThree times per day. (NCI)
TiwThree Times a WeekThree times a week
x1One TimeOne Time
x2Two timesTwo times or twice
x3Three timesThree times
x4Four timesFour times
RouteAccess Route of Administration Text Code20035866.0CHARACTER
UrethralIntraurethral Route of AdministrationAdministration of a drug directly into the urethra.
Oral and IVOral and Intravenous Route of AdministrationThe introduction of a substance to the mouth or into the gastrointestinal tract by the way of the mouth, usually for systemic action. It is the most common, convenient, and usually the safest and least expensive route of drug administration, but it uses the most complicated pathway to the tissues and bioavailability varies. The disadvantages of method are hepatic first pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation of the drug within the gastrointestinal tract. This prohibits oral administration of certain classes of drugs especially peptides and proteins.: An article which expresses the relation of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.: Administration within or into a vein or veins.: The course by which a substance was administered in order to reach the site of action in the body.
IntrauterineIntrauterine Route of AdministrationAdministration within the uterus.
CIVContinuous Intravenous InfusionA route of administration of a fluid drug form into a vein or veins, over a time duration of equal to or more than 24 hours. Method allows to maintain steady state plasma/serum medication levels, a smaller total daily dose of drug to achieve the same pharmacodynamic endpoint in comparison with intermittent or bolus infusion, and may result in lower toxicity. The method has a positive impact on health-care costs.
ENDOTREndotracheal Route of AdministrationEndotracheal drug administration involves the introduction of the agent directly through the endotracheal tube in an intubated patient. Generally this route is considered as a last resort for drug administration, and provides a fast, effective means of drug delivery in a patient who requires immediate medication. Plasma levels obtained via endotracheal administration are considerably less than those obtained with an equal dosage administered intravenously or intraosseously. Endotracheal administration must be followed by hyper-insufflation of the lungs to promote optimal drug absorption.
G TubeGastrostomy TubeDrug administration through a gastric fistula or a surgically created artificial opening into the stomach through the abdominal wall with insertion of a tube.
IAIntra-ArterialWithin an artery (blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to tissues and organs in the body).
IDIntradermalWithin the dermis, which is the layer of skin below the epidermis (outermost layer).
IHIntrahepatic(in-tra-hep-AT-ik) Within the liver.
IHIIntrahepatic InfusionAdministration of a fluid form of the drug via a blood vessel into the liver over the sustained period of time.
IMIntramuscularIntramuscular. Within or into muscle.
InhalatnInhalationAccess within the respiratory tract by inhaling orally or nasally for a systemic or local effect.
InterstlInterstitial Route of AdministrationAdministration to or in the interstices of a tissue.
IntraventricularIntraventricular Route of AdministrationAdministration within a ventricle.
IntravesicalIntravesicalWithin the bladder.
INTUMIntratumoralWithin a tumor.
IPIntraperitoneal(IN-tra-per-ih-toe-NEE-al) IP. Within the peritoneal cavity (the area that contains the abdominal organs).
ITIntrathecalAdministration within the cerebrospinal fluid at any level of the cerebrospinal axis, including injection into the cerebral ventricles.
IVIntravenous BolusAdministration of a drug directly into circulation via a vein or veins over a time duration of less than or equal to 30 minutes. Method results in 100% bioavailability of the agent due to an absence of the absorption phase. FDA CDER (HL7) numeric code: 0138
IVIIntravenous InfusionIntroduction of a drug directly into venous circulation over the time duration of more than 30 minutes but less than 24 hours. Method results in 100% bioavailability of the agent due to an absence of the absorption phase and provides a precise and continuous mode of drug therapy, especially for drugs with a narrow therapeutic index. To achieve the steady state quickly, the loading dose is used. Intravenously administered drug is diluted in the pooled venous blood and pumped through lungs before entering systematic circulation (lung first-pass effect). The target organ receives only the fraction of drug corresponding to the fraction of received arterial blood.
NASALNasalAdministration to the nose; administered by way of the nose.
NGNasogastricAdministration through the nose and into the stomach, usually by means of a tube.
Oph EachOphthalmic, Each EyeOphthalmic, Each Eye (Both Eyes)
Oph LeftOphthalmic, Left EyeOphthalmic, Left Eye only
Oph RtOphthalmic, Right EyeOphthalmic, Right Eye only
OticAuricular Route of AdministrationAdministration to or by way of the ear.
POOralThe introduction of a substance to the mouth or into the gastrointestinal tract by the way of the mouth, usually for systemic action. It is the most common, convenient, and usually the safest and least expensive route of drug administration, but it uses the most complicated pathway to the tissues and bioavailability varies. The disadvantages of method are hepatic first pass metabolism and enzymatic degradation of the drug within the gastrointestinal tract. This prohibits oral administration of certain classes of drugs especially peptides and proteins.
PRRectalRelated to the rectum
RTRadiationThe area of the body exposed to radiation during radiation therapy.
SCSubcutaneousBeneath the skin.
SublingualSublingualBeneath the tongue.
SWSPSwish & SpitAdministration of a liquid substance to the oral mucosa by swishing the drug inside the mouth for a certain amount of time then spiting it out. The drug action is mostly topical/local.
SWSWSwish & SwallowAdministration of a liquid substance to the oral mucosa by swishing the drug inside the mouth for a certain amount of time then allowed to be swallowed. The drug action is both topical and systemic
TOPTopicalOn the surface of the body.
TransdermalTransdermalThrough the skin.
TransmucosalTransmucosal RouteAdministration of a substance to the mucosa; often resulting in systemic action due to absorption.
UnknownUnknown Route of AdministrationNo value exists.
VaginalVaginal RouteRelating to the vagina or to any sheath.
indicationConcomitant Agent Concomitant Intervention or Procedure Reason20038704.0CHARACTER
Accelerate Hematopoietic RecoveryAccelerate Hematopoietic RecoveryAccelerate Hematopoietic Recovery
AcidityAcidA substance that yields hydrogen ions or protons in aqueous solutions; a substance capable of accepting a pair of electrons for the formation of a coordinate covalent bond; a substance whose hydrogen can be replaced by metals or basic radicals, or which react with bases to form salts and water.
Adrenal SuppressionAdrenal SuppressionAdrenal Suppression
Allergic ReactionHypersensitivityAltered reactivity to an antigen, which can result in pathologic reactions upon subsequent exposure to that particular antigen.
AllergyAllergyAllergy
AlopeciaAlopeciaAlopecia
AnemiaAnemiaA reduction in the number of red blood cells per cu mm, the amount of hemoglobin in 100 ml of blood, and the volume of packed red blood cells per 100 ml of blood. Clinically, anemia represents a reduction in the oxygen-transporting capacity of a designated volume of blood, resulting from an imbalance between blood loss (through hemorrhage or hemolysis) and blood production. Signs and symptoms of anemia may include pallor of the skin and mucous membranes, shortness of breath, palpitations of the heart, soft systolic murmurs, lethargy, and fatigability. --2004
AnesthesiaAnesthetic Agent(an-es-THET-iks) Substances that cause loss of feeling or awareness. Local anesthetics cause loss of feeling in a part of the body. General anesthetics put the person to sleep.
AnorexiaAnorexiaA disorder characterized by a loss of appetite.
Anti-anginaAnginaA heart condition marked by paroxysms of chest pain due to reduced oxygen to the heart.
AnticoagulationAnticoagulationNo value exists.
AntipsychoticAntipsychoticAntipsychotic
AnxietyAnxietyApprehension of danger and dread accompanied by restlessness, tension, tachycardia, and dyspnea unattached to a clearly identifiable stimulus.
ApheresisPheresis(fer-E-sis) A procedure in which blood is collected, part of the blood such as platelets or white blood cells is taken out, and the rest of the blood is returned to the donor.
AppetiteAppetiteA natural recurring desire for food. (On-line Medical Dictionary)
ArrhythmiaArrhythmiaArrhythmia; an abnormal rate of muscle contractions in the heart.
ArthralgiaArthralgiaArthralgia
ArthritisArthritisInflammation of a joint or a state characterized by inflammation of joints.
AscitesAscitesAscites
AsthmaAsthmaAsthma
Attention Deficit DisorderAttention Deficit Disorderbehavior disorder originating in childhood in which the essential features are signs of developmentally inappropriate inattention, impulsivity, and hyperactivity; although most individuals have symptoms of both inattention and hyperactivity-impulsivity, one or the other pattern may be predominant; symptoms often attenuate during late adolescence although a minority experience the full complement of symptoms into mid-adulthood.
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)Attention Deficit Hyperactivity DisorderA disorder characterized by a marked pattern of inattention and/or hyperactivity-impulsivity that is inconsistent with developmental level and clearly interferes with functioning in at least two settings (e.g. at home and at school). At least some of the symptoms must be present before the age of 7 years.
Benign Prostatic HyperplasiaBenign Prostatic HyperplasiaA non-cancerous nodular enlargement of the prostate gland. It is characterized by the presence of epithelial cell nodules, and stromal nodules containing fibrous and smooth muscle elements. It is the most common urologic disorder in men, causing blockage of urine flow.
Bipolar DisorderBipolar DisorderA major affective disorder marked by severe mood swings (manic or major depressive episodes) and a tendency to remission and recurrence.
Birth ControlContraceptionThe prevention of conception or impregnation by the use of devices or drugs or surgery.
Blepharitis (Eyelid Inflammation)BlepharitisBlepharitis
BloatingBloatingBLOATING
Bony DiseaseBony DiseaseBony Disease
BronchitisBronchitisBronchitis
BronchospasmBronchospasmSpasmodic contraction of the smooth muscle of the bronchi.
BursitisBursitisBursitis
CardiacCardiacHaving to do with the heart.
CellulitisCellulitisAn acute, spreading infection of the deep tissues of the skin and muscle that causes the skin to become warm and tender and may also cause fever, chills, swollen lymph nodes, and blisters.
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD)Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary DiseaseChronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
CMV TherapyCytomegalovirus TherapyA genus of the family herpesviridae, subfamily betaherpesvirinae, infecting the salivary glands, liver, spleen, lungs, eyes, and other organs, in which they produce characteristically enlarged cells with intranuclear inclusions.: An action or administration of therapeutic agents to produce an effect that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.
CNS DiseaseCentral Nervous System Disease or DisorderThe main information-processing organs of the nervous system, consisting of the brain, spinal cord, and meninges.: Any abnormal condition of the body or mind that causes discomfort, dysfunction, or distress to the person affected or those in contact with the person. The term is often used broadly to include injuries, disabilities, syndromes, symptoms, deviant behaviors, and atypical variations of structure and function.
Complicating Disease or ConditionComplicating Disease or ConditionComplicating Disease or Condition
CongestionCongestionCongestion
ConjunctivitisConjunctivitisConjunctivitis; inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye.
ConstipationConstipationConstipation
Contrast StudyContrast Agent Image StudySubstances used in radiography that allow visualization of certain tissues.: A radiographic technique used to evaluate a specific anatomic location for a specific purpose.
CoughCoughA sudden, often repetitive, spasmodic contraction of the thoracic cavity, resulting in violent release of air from the lungs, and usually accompanied by a distinctive sound.
DehydrationDehydrationDehydration
DepressionDepressionDepression; a mental state of depressed mood characterised by feelings of sadness, despair and discouragement. (On-line Medical Dictionary)
DermatitisDermatitisDermatitis
DiabetesDiabetes Mellitus(dye-a-BEE-teez) A disease in which the body does not properly control the amount of sugar in the blood. As a result, the level of sugar in the blood is too high. This disease occurs when the body does not produce enough insulin or does not use it properly.
DiarrheaDiarrheaDiarrhea
Dry SkinDryness SkinDryness; lacking moisture, or the feeling thereof.: 1. An organ and the enveloping membrane of the body; includes, in addition to the epidermis and dermis, all of the derivatives of the epidermis, e.g., hairs, nails, sudoriferous and sebaceous glands, and mammary glands. Subdivisions of the skin surround various body parts; as a whole, the skin constitutes the external surface of the body. 2. The rind, capsule, or covering of any body or part.
DyspepsiaDyspepsiaDyspepsia
DysphagiaDysphagiaDysphagia
DyspneaDyspneaDifficult, painful breathing or shortness of breath.
DysuriaDysuriaDysuria
EaracheEaracheEarache
EdemaEdemaEdema
Electrolyte ImbalanceElectrolyte ImbalanceHigher or lower than normal values for the serum electrolytes; usually affecting NA, K, CHL, CO2, glucose, bun.
Empirical CoverageEmpirical CoverageEmpirical Coverage
EngraftmentEngraftmentThe establishment of viable, functional grafted tissue within the body of a host.
Epiphora (Watery Eyes)Epiphora (Watery Eyes)Epiphora (Watery Eyes)
EpistaxisEpistaxisEpistaxis
Erectile DysfunctionImpotenceImpotence
ErythemaErythemaRedness of the skin produced by congestion of the capillaries. This condition may result from a variety of causes.
EsophagitisEsophagitisInflammation, acute or chronic, of the esophagus caused by bacteria, chemicals, or trauma.
ExtrapyramidalExtrapyramidal symptomsExtrapyramidal symptoms
Eye RednessEye RednessEye Redness
FatigueFatigueFatigue
FeverFeverFever, also known as pyrexia, is the elevation of the body's temperature above the upper limit of normal, usually taken as 37.7 degrees C. Most fevers are caused by infections and almost all infectious diseases cause fever. (Wikipedia)
Fever w/Low WBCFever LeukocyteFever, also known as pyrexia, is the elevation of the body's temperature above the upper limit of normal, usually taken as 37.7 degrees C. Most fevers are caused by infections and almost all infectious diseases cause fever. (Wikipedia): White blood cells. These include granular leukocytes (BASOPHILS, EOSINOPHILS, and NEUTROPHILS) as well as non-granular leukocytes (LYMPHOCYTES and MONOCYTES).
FlatulenceFlatulenceFlatulence
Flu SymptomsInfluenza SymptomAn acute viral infection of the respiratory tract, occurring in isolated cases, in epidemics, or in pandemics; it is caused by serologically different strains of viruses (influenzaviruses) designated A, B, and C, has a 3-day incubation period, and usually lasts for 3 to 10 days. It is marked by inflammation of the nasal mucosa, pharynx, and conjunctiva; headache; myalgia; often fever, chills, and prostration; and occasionally involvement of the myocardium or central nervous system.: An indication that a person has a condition or disease. Some examples of symptoms are headache, fever, fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and pain.
Fluid OverloadFluid OverloadFluid Overload
Fluid RetentionFLUID RETENTIONFLUID RETENTION
Gastric UlcerGastric UlcerUlceration of the mucous membrane of the stomach. (From Dorland, 28th ed)
GastritisGastritisInflammation of the lining of the stomach.
Gastroesophageal Reflux DiseaseGastroesophageal Reflux DiseaseReflux of gastric juice and/or duodenal contents (bile acids, pancreatic juice) into the distal esophagus, commonly due to incompetence of the lower esophageal sphincter. Gastric regurgitation is an extension of this process with entry of fluid into the pharynx or mouth.
Gastrointestinal distressGastrointestinal distressGastrointestinal distress
GI DecontaminationGastrointestinal DecontaminationTreatment of the gastrointestinal tract with antibiotics to reduce microorganisms.
GlaucomaGlaucomaAn ocular disease, occurring in many forms, having as its primary characteristics an unstable or a sustained increase in the intraocular pressure which the eye cannot withstand without damage to its structure or impairment of its function. The consequences of the increased pressure may be manifested in a variety of symptoms, depending upon type and severity, such as excavation of the optic disk, hardness of the eyeball, corneal anesthesia, reduced visual acuity, seeing of colored halos around lights, disturbed dark adaptation, visual field defects, and headaches. (Dictionary of Visual Science, 4th ed)
GoutGoutHereditary metabolic disorder characterized by recurrent acute arthritis, hyperuricemia and deposition of sodium urate in and around the joints, sometimes with formation of uric acid calculi.
GranulocytopeniaGranulocytopeniaA decrease in the number of mature granulocytes (neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils) in the peripheral blood. -- 2004
GVHD ProphylaxisGraft Versus Host Disease Preventive InterventionAn incompatibility reaction (which may be fatal) in a subject (host) of low immunological competence (deficient lymphoid tissue) who has been the recipient of immunologically competent lymphoid tissue from a donor who lacks at least one antigen possessed by the recipient host; the reaction, or disease, is the result of action of the transplanted cells against those host tissues that possess the antigen not possessed by the donor. Seen most commonly following bone marrow transplantation, acute disease is seen after 5-40 days and chronic disease weeks to months after transplantation, affecting, principally, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin.: An attempt to prevent disease.
GVHD TherapyGraft Versus Host Disease TherapyAn incompatibility reaction (which may be fatal) in a subject (host) of low immunological competence (deficient lymphoid tissue) who has been the recipient of immunologically competent lymphoid tissue from a donor who lacks at least one antigen possessed by the recipient host; the reaction, or disease, is the result of action of the transplanted cells against those host tissues that possess the antigen not possessed by the donor. Seen most commonly following bone marrow transplantation, acute disease is seen after 5-40 days and chronic disease weeks to months after transplantation, affecting, principally, the gastrointestinal tract, liver, and skin.: An action or administration of therapeutic agents to produce an effect that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.
Hand Foot Syndrome (HFS)Palmar-Plantar ErythodysthesiaA condition marked by pain, swelling, numbness, tingling, or redness of the hands or feet. It sometimes occurs as a side effect of certain anticancer drugs. Also known as hand-foot syndrome.
HeadacheHeadachePain in various parts of the head, not confined to the area of distribution of any nerve.
Hemolytic Urem SyndromeHemolytic Uremic Syndrome symptomsSyndrome of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, and acute renal failure, with pathological finding of thrombotic microangiopathy in kidney and renal cortical necrosis.
HemorrhageHemorrhageBleeding or escape of blood from a vessel.
HemorrhoidsHemorrhoidVaricosities of the hemorrhoidal venous plexuses.
Heparin ReversalHeparin ReversalReversal of the effects of heparin, an anticoagulant.
Hepatic Lab abnormalityLaboratory Hepatic AbnormalityLaboratory; a workplace for the conduct of scientific research.: Refers to the liver.: A condition that differs from the usual physical or mental state.
Hiatal herniaHiatal herniaHiatal hernia
HiccoughsHiccoughA diaphragmatic spasm causing a sudden inhalation which is interrupted by a spasmodic closure of the glottis, producing a noise. (On-line Medical Dictionary)
HIVHuman Immunodeficiency VirusHuman immunodeficiency virus. Species of LENTIVIRUS, subgenus primate lentiviruses (LENTIVIRUSES, PRIMATE), formerly designated T-cell lymphotropic virus type III/lymphadenopathy-associated virus (HTLV-III/LAV). It is acknowledged to be the agent responsible for the acute infectious manifestations, neurologic disorders, and immunologic abnormalities linked to the ACQUIRED IMMUNODEFICIENCY SYNDROME.
Hormonal ManipulationHORMONAL MANIPULATIONHORMONAL MANIPULATION
Hot FlashesHot FlashesA sudden, temporary onset of body warmth, flushing, and sweating (often associated with menopause).
HypercalcemiaHypercalcemiaAbnormally high level of calcium in the blood.
HypercholesterolemiaHypercholesterolemiaHypercholesterolemia; the presence of an abnormal amount of cholesterol in the cells and plasma of the blood.
HyperglycemiaHyperglycemiaAbnormally high blood sugar.
HyperkalemiaHyperkalemiaHyperkalemia; higher than normal levels of potassium in the circulating blood; associated with kidney failure or sometimes with the use of diuretic drugs.
HyperlipidemiaHyperlipidemiaAn excess of lipids in the blood.
HyperparathyroidismHyperparathyroidismNo Value Exists
HypertensionHypertensionAbnormally high blood pressure.
HyperthyroidismHyperthyroidismExcessive functional activity of the thyroid gland.
HyperuricemiaHyperuricemiaElevated blood concentrations of uric acid.
HypoalbuminemiaHypoalbuminemiaHypoalbuminemia; an abnormally low blood level of albumin.
HypocalcemiaHypocalcemiaHypocalemia; lower than normal levels of calcium in the circulating blood.
HypokalemiaHypokalemiaHypokalemia; lower than normal levels of potassium in the circulating blood.
HypomagnesemiaHypomagnesemiaHypermagnesemia; lower than normal levels of magnesium in the circulating blood.
HypophosphatemiaHypophosphatemiaHypophosphatemia; lower than normal levels of phosphates in the circulating blood.
HypotensionHypotensionAbnormally low blood pressure seen in shock but not necessarily indicative of it. (Dorland, 28th ed)
HypothyroidismHypothyroidismA condition in which the production of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland is diminished. Signs and symptoms of hypothyroidism include low metabolic rate, tendency to weight gain, somnolence and sometimes myxedema. In the United States, the most common cause of hypothyroidism is Hashimoto's thyroiditis, an autoimmune disorder. SYN athyrea. --2004
HypoxiaHypoxiareduction of oxygen supply to tissue below physiological level.
ImmunosuppressionImmunosuppressionAn Immunosuppressive Effect involves interference with, or restraint of, the function of biologic molecules and complexes, or cellular, cell, or tissue components of a normal immune response.
IndigestionIndigestionINDIGESTION
Induce SedationSedationThe process of allaying nervous excitement or the state of being calmed. (Taber's)
InfectionInfection and infestationA disorder resulting from the presence and activity of a microbial, viral, or parasitic agent. It can be transmitted by direct or indirect contact. -- 2003
InflammationInflammationA localized protective response resulting from injury or destruction of tissues. Inflammation serves to destroy, dilute, or wall off both the injurious agent and the injured tissue. In the acute phase, inflammation is characterized by the signs of pain, heat, redness, swelling, and loss of function. Histologically, inflammation involves a complex series of events, including dilatation of arterioles, capillaries, and venules, with increased permeability and blood flow; exudation of fluids, including plasma proteins; and leukocyte migration into the site of inflammation. --2004
Injection Site ReactionInjection Site ReactionAn intense reaction (usually immunologic) developing at the site of injection
InsomniaInsomniaDifficulty in going to sleep or getting enough sleep.
ItchingItching sensationIntense itching sensation
Keratitis sicca (Dry Eyes)Dry EyesDry Eyes
Lactose IntoleranceLactose IntoleranceThe disease state resulting from the absence of lactase enzyme in the musocal cells of the gastrointestinal tract, and therefore an inability to break down the disaccharide lactose in milk for absorption from the gastrointestinal tract. It is manifested by indigestion of a mild nature to severe diarrhea. It may be due to inborn defect genetically conditioned or may be acquired.
Leg crampsLeg crampsLeg cramps
Line OcclusionLine OcclusionLine Occlusion
Line PatencyLine PatencyLine Patency
Local AnesthesiaLocal AnesthesiaLocal Anesthesia
Macular degenerationMacular degenerationMacular degeneration
MalignancyMalignant NeoplasmA tumor composed of atypical neoplastic, often pleomorphic cells that invade other tissues. Malignant neoplasms usually metastasize to distant anatomic sites and may recur after excision. The most common malignant neoplasms are carcinomas (adenocarcinomas or squamous cell carcinomas), Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, leukemias, melanomas, and sarcomas. -- 2004
Malignant HyperthermiaMalignant HyperthermiaMalignant Hyperthermia
Menopausal symptomsNatural Menopause(MEN-o-pawz) The time of life when a woman's menstrual periods stop permanently. Also called "change of life."
Metabolic ImbalanceMETABOLIC IMBALANCEMETABOLIC IMBALANCE
MoodMoodNo value exists
Mouth SoresMOUTH SORESMOUTH SORES
MucositisMucositisA complication of some cancer therapies in which the lining of the digestive system becomes inflamed. Often seen as sores in the mouth.
Muscle SpasmMuscle SpasmA sudden, violent, involuntary contraction of a muscle or group of muscles.
MyalgiaMyalgiaMyalgia
Myasthenia GravisMyasthenia GravisA chronic autoimmune neuromuscular disorder characterized by skeletal muscle weakness. It is caused by the blockage of the acetylcholine receptors at the neuromuscular junction.
Nail ChangesNAIL CHANGESNAIL CHANGES
NarcolepsyNarcolepsyNarcolepsy
Nasal SymptomNASAL SYMPTOMNASAL SYMPTOM
NauseaNauseaNausea is the sensation of unease and discomfort from the stomach, with the sufferer feeling that he is about to vomit. (from Wikipedia)
Nausea and vomitingNausea And VomitingNausea is the sensation of unease and discomfort from the stomach, with the sufferer feeling that he is about to vomit. (from Wikipedia): An article which expresses the relation of connection or addition. It is used to conjoin a word with a word, a clause with a clause, or a sentence with a sentence.: Vomiting; the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
NeuropathyNeuropathyA disorder affecting the cranial nerves or the peripheral nervous system. It is manifested with pain, tingling, numbness, and muscle weakness. It may be the result of physical injury, toxic substances, viral diseases, diabetes, renal failure, cancer, and drugs. -- 2004
NeutropeniaNeutropeniaNeutropenia
NutritionNutritionThe taking in and use of food and other nourishing material by the body. Nutrition is a 3-part process. First, food or drink is consumed. Second, the body breaks down the food or drink into nutrients. Third, the nutrients travel through the bloodstream to different parts of the body where they are used as
OsteoporosisOsteoporosisOsteoporosis
PainPainAn unpleasant sensation induced by noxious stimuli and generally received by specialized nerve endings.
PalliationPalliative therapyPalliative therapy
Pancreatic insufficiencyPancreatic InsufficiencyInability of the exocrine pancreas to produce and secrete an adequate amount of digestive enzymes into the small intestine. Patients present with symptoms of malabsorption syndrome, abdominal discomfort, and bloating. Causes include chronic pancreatitis, cystic fibrosis, and autoimmune disorders.
Parkinson's DiseaseParkinson's Diseaseprogressive, degenerative disorder of the nervous system characterized by tremors, rigidity, bradykinesia, postural instability, and gait abnormalities; caused by a loss of neurons and a decrease of dopamine in the basal ganglia.
Partial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) ProlongationPartial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) ProlongationPartial Thromboplastin Time (PTT) Prolongation
Periodontal DiseasePeriodontal DiseasePeriodontal Disease
PetechiaePetechia(peh-TEH-kee-a) Pinpoint, unraised, round red spots under the skin caused by bleeding.
PharyngitisPHARYNGITISPHARYNGITIS
PhlebitisPHLEBITISPhlebitis; inflammation of a vein.
Pleural EffusionPleural EffusionIncreased amounts of fluid within the pleural cavity containing no malignant cells
PneumonitisPNEUMONIAPNEUMONIA
Port OcclusionOcclusion within Medical DeviceIssue associated with obstruction, closure or blockage of device opening, pipe, tube or another narrow comprising part.
Post Traumatic Stress DisorderPost Traumatic Stress DisorderPost Traumatic Stress Disorder
PostTreatmentAfter Treatment completionAfter Treatment completion
PrechemotherapyBEFORE CHEMOTHERAPYBefore chemotherapy treatment is given
Preprocedure/Diagnostic TestingBefore a Procedure or Diagnostic TestingBefore a Procedure or Diagnostic Testing
PreTreatmentBefore TreatmentBefore Treatment
ProphylaxisPreventive InterventionAn attempt to prevent disease.
PruritusPruritusAn intense itching sensation.
PseudogoutPseudogoutNo Value Exists
PsoriasisPsoriasisA common genetically determined, chronic, inflammatory skin disease characterized by rounded erythematous, dry, scaling patches. The lesions have a predilection for nails, scalp, genitalia, extensor surfaces, and the lumbosacral region. Accelerated epidermopoiesis is considered to be the fundamental pathologic feature in psoriasis.
Pulmonary EmbolusPulmonary EmbolusPulmonary Embolus
RashSkin RashAny change in the skin which affects its appearance or texture. A rash may be localised to one part of the body, or affect all the skin. Rashes may cause the skin to change color, itch, become warm, bumpy, dry, cracked or blistered, swell and may be painful
Rectal BleedingRectal bleedingRectal bleeding
RefluxRefluxReflux
Renal/UrinaryRenal UrinaryOf or pertaining to the kidney.: Having to do with urine or the organs of the body that produce and get rid of urine.
ReplacementREPLACEMENTThe act of removing one thing and putting another thing in its place.
Respiratory Distress/DyspneaRespiratory Distress DyspneaNo value exists.: Difficult, painful breathing or shortness of breath.
Restless Leg SyndromeRestless Leg SyndromeRestless Leg Syndrome
RestlessnessRESTLESSNESSRESTLESSNESS
RhinitisRhinitisAn inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the nose, usually associated with nasal discharge.
RhinorrheaRhinorrheaNo Value Exists
RigorsRigors and shakingShaking chills
ScabiesScabiesScabies
SeizuresSeizurethe most dramatic type of seizure, characterized by tonic and clonic contraction of most skeletal muscles.
SinusitisSinusitisAn inflammatory process of the mucous membranes of the paranasal sinuses that occurs in three stages: acute, subacute, and chronic. Sinusitis results from any condition causing ostial obstruction or from pathophysiologic changes in the mucociliary transport mechanism.
Skin IrritationSkin IrritationA mild inflammatory dermal tissue reaction; it can be caused by physical contact with an irritant or can be a local response to a systemic trigger.
SleepSleepA natural and periodic state of rest during which consciousness of the world is suspended.
Sleep ApneaSleep ApneaCessation of breathing for short periods during sleep. It is classified as obstructive, central, or mixed obstructive-central. It can occur at any age but it is more frequent in people over forty. Risk factors include male sex and obesity.
Smoking CessationSmoking CessationDiscontinuation of the habit of smoking.
Stomach CrampsStomach CrampsStomach Cramps
StomatitisStomatitisStomatitis
SupplementSupplementSomething added to complete a thing, make up for a deficiency, or extend or strengthen the whole; serving to complete or make an addition.
ThrombocytopeniaThrombocytopeniaA decrease in the number of blood platelets.
ThrombusBlood ClotAn aggregation of blood factors, primarily platelets and fibrin with entrapment of cellular elements, frequently causing vascular obstruction at the point of its formation.
ThrushOral CandidiasisInfection of the mucous membranes of the mouth by a fungus of the genus CANDIDA. (Dorland, 27th ed)
TremorsTremorsTremors
UrinaryUrinary UrinaryHaving to do with urine or the organs of the body that produce and get rid of urine.: Having to do with urine or the organs of the body that produce and get rid of urine.
UrticariaUrticariaA vascular reaction of the skin characterized by erythema and wheal formation due to localized increase of vascular permeability. The causative mechanism may be allergy, infection, or stress.
Vaginal DrynessDryness of the vaginaDryness of the vagina
Vascular AccessVascular AccessVascular Access
Vasodilitation (Flush)Vasodilitation (Flush)Vasodilitation (Flush)
Venous ThrombosisVENOUS THROMBOSISVENOUS THROMBOSIS
VertigoVertigo (Dizziness)Vertigo
VitaminsVitaminKey nutrients that the body needs in small amounts to grow and stay strong. Examples are vitamins A, C, and E.
VomitingVomitingVomiting; the reflex act of ejecting the contents of the stomach through the mouth.
Weight GainWeight GainWeight Gain
Weight LossWeight LossA reduction in overall body mass.
WheezingWheezingA symptom and a finding during physical examination, characterized by a high-pitched, whistling sound during breathing. It results from the narrowing or obstruction of the respiratory airways. The most common causes of wheezing are asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, tracheobronchitis, and pulmonary edema.
XerosisXEROSISXEROSIS
XerostomiaDry Mouthdryness of the mouth due to salivary gland secretion dysfunction.
Start DateIntervention Occurrence Begin Date30287441.0DATEmm/dd/yyyy
Stop DateIntervention Occurrence End Date30287461.0DATEmm/dd/yyyy
DoseAgent Dose21827282.0NUMBER
Units of MeasureIntervention Potency Unit of Measure for Unified Code for Units of Measure Code30287501.0CHARACTER
%PercentLITERAL
%Percent UnitA unit for expressing a number as a fraction of hundred (on the basis of a rate or proportion per hundred).
10^3ThousandA natural number following 999 and preceding 1001 and the quantity that it denotes: ten times one hundred.
10^5{Cells}/kgHundred Thousand Cells per KilogramA derived unit expressed as a number of cells in hundreds of thousands per unit of mass equal to one kilogram.
10^6MillionA natural number following 999999 and preceding 100001 and the quantity that it denotes: one thousand thousand.
10^6eVMillion electron voltA natural number following 999999 and preceding 100001 and the quantity that it denotes: one thousand thousand.: A unit of energy defined as the kinetic energy acquired by an electron in passing through a potential difference of one volt in a vacuum. Its value is experimentally determined as 1,602 177 x 10E-19 joule (approximately). The unit is accepted for use with SI units.
10^6{Cells}/kgMillion Cells per KilogramA derived unit expressed as a number of cells in millions per unit of mass equal to one kilogram.
10^6{pfu}Million Plaque Forming UnitsA measure of viable infectious entities expressed in millions in the specimen or product defined as the smallest quantity that can produce a cytopathic effect in the host cell culture challenged with the defined inoculum, visible under the microscope or/and to the naked eye as a plaque.
10^6{VP}Million Viral ParticlesA unit for virus amount measurement that represents a number of viral particles (live and dead combined) expressed in millions.
10^7{Cells}/kgTen Million Cells per KilogramA derived unit expressed as a number of cells in tens of millions per unit of mass equal to one kilogram.
10^7{pfu}Ten Million Plaque Forming UnitsA measure of viable infectious entities expressed in tens of millions in the specimen or product defined as the smallest quantity that can produce a cytopathic effect in the host cell culture challenged with the defined inoculum, visible under the microscope or/and to the naked eye as a plaque.
10^8{pfu}Hundred Million Plaque Forming UnitsA measure of viable infectious entities expressed in hundreds of millions in the specimen or product defined as the smallest quantity that can produce a cytopathic effect in the host cell culture challenged with the defined inoculum, visible under the microscope or/and to the naked eye as a plaque.
10^9{Cells}/kgBillion Cells per KilogramA derived unit expressed as a number of cells in billions per unit of mass equal to one kilogram.
10^9{pfu}Billion Plaque Forming UnitsA measure of viable infectious entities expressed in billions in the specimen or product defined as the smallest quantity that can produce a cytopathic effect in the host cell culture challenged with the defined inoculum, visible under the microscope or/and to the naked eye as a plaque.
cGyCentigrayThe metric unit of absorbed radiation dose equal to the absorption of one hundredth of joule of radiation energy per kilogram of matter.
CiCurieA unit of radioactivity in the CGS system, defined as 3.7 E10 atomic disintegrations or other nuclear transformations per second. One curie is equal to 37 gigabecquerels.
dLDeciliterThe unit of volume equal to one tenth of a liter. Accepted for use with the SI.
eqEquivalent WeightA unit of relative amount of a substance that combines with or displaces 8.0 grams of oxygen or 1.008 gram of hydrogen. The unit is usually expressed in grams and is equal to the amount of substance that gains or loses one mole of electrons in a redox reaction, or to the amount of substances that releases or accepts one mole of hydrogen ions in a neutralization reaction; or to the amount of electrolyte that carries one mole of positive or negative charge. This is a large unit and measurements are more often done in its derivatives, e.g. in milliequivalents.
gGramA metric unit of mass equal to one one thousandth of a kilogram.
g/dGram per DayGrams per day.
g/m2Gram per Square MeterA metric unit of areal density defined as a spread rate at which one gram of a substance is spread over the area of one square meter. It is equal to approximately 0.029 4935 ounce per square yard. Also used as a dose calculation unit to express quantity of an agent in grams per body surface area in square meters.
g/wkGram per WeekA dose administration rate unit equal to the rate at which a gram of a product is delivered or administered over the time period of one week. This is also a unit of mass flow rate equivalent to the rate at which a gram of matter crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to one week.
GyGrayThe SI derived unit of absorbed radiation dose. One gray is equal to an absorbed dose of one joule per kilogram of matter; one gray equals 100 rads. The unit is named for the British physician L. Harold Gray, an authority on the use of radiation in the treatment of cancer.
hHourIn modern usage, an hour is defined as a unit of time 60 minutes, or 3600 seconds in length. It is approximately 1/24 of a median day.
HzHertzThe SI derived unit of frequency; equal to one oscillation per second.
JJouleA unit of electrical, mechanical, and thermal energy (as well as work and quantity of heat) in the SI system, equal to the work done when the point of application of a force of one newton is displaced through a distance of one meter in the direction of the force or the work done when a current of one ampere passes through a resistance of one ohm for one second. Joule is equal to 0.23889 gram-calorie (mean).
J/cm2Joule per Square CentimeterA unit of radiant exposure equal to radiant energy of one joule arriving upon a surface area of one square centimeter. The unit is also used for measurement of output of the energy-emitting source.
keVKiloelectronvoltA unit of energy equal to 1000 electronvolts, or (approximately) 1,602 177 x 10-16 joule. The unit is accepted for use with SI units.
kgKILOGRAMThe basic SI unit of mass. It is defined as the mass of an international prototype in the form of a platinum-iridium cylinder kept at Sevres in France. It is the only basic unit still defined in terms of a material object, and also the only one with a prefix [kilo] already in place. A kilogram is equal to 1,000 grams and 2.204 622 6 pounds.
kHzKilohertzA unit of measure denoting the frequency equal to 1000 cycles per second meaning e.g. that the cylical waveform changes from one state to the other (from one polarity to the other) 1000 times per second.
kPaKilopascalA SI derived unit of pressure equivalent to 1000 newtons per square meter or 10000 bars or to 0.145 pound per square inch.
kUKilounitA quantity equivalent to one thousand units (10E3 units).
kU/kgKilounit per KilogramAn arbitrary unit of substance content expressed in thousands of units of biological activity per unit of mass equal to one kilogram. Kilounit per kilogram is also used as a dose calculation unit expressed in thousands of arbitrary units per one kilogram of body mass.
kU/LKilounit per LiterAn arbitrary unit of substance concentration equal to the concentration at which one liter of mixture contains one thousand units of a substance.
LLiterA common metric unit of volume equal to one cubic decimeter, 1000 cubic centimeters, or 0.001 cubic meter, or approximately 61.023 744 cubic inches.
L/minLiter per MinuteA metric unit of volumetric flow rate defined as the rate at which one liter of matter crosses a given surface during the period of time equal to one minute.
mCiMillicurieA unit of radioactivity equal to one thousandth of a curie or 37 megabecquerels, and corresponding to a radioactivity of 37 millions of atomic disintegrations per second.
meqMilliequivalentA unit of relative amount of a substance equal to one thousandth of an equivalent weight.
meq/24.hMilliequivalent per 24 HoursA unit of relative amount of substance flow rate equivalent to the rate at which one thousandth of an equivalent of substance crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to twenty four hours.
meq/dLMilliequivalent per DeciliterA concentration unit measured as a number of milliequivalents of solute per deciliter of solution.
meq/hMilliequivalent per HourA unit of relative amount of substance flow rate equivalent to the rate at which one thousandth of an equivalent of substance crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to one hour.
meq/LMilliequivalent per LiterA concentration unit measured as a number of milliequivalents of solute per liter of solution.
mgMilligramA measure of weight. A milligram is approximately 450,000 times smaller than a pound and 28,000 times smaller than an ounce.
mg/24.hMilligram per 24 HoursA unit of mass flow rate equivalent to the rate at which one thousandth of a gram of matter crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to twenty four hours. Milligram per twenty four hours is also a dose administration rate unit equal to the rate at which one thousandth of a gram of a product is administered per unit of time equal to twenty four hours.
mg/dLMilligram per DeciliterA unit of mass concentration defined as the concentration of one milligram of a substance in unit volume of the mixture equal to one cubic deciliter or 100 cubic centimeters. It is also a unit of mass density (volumic mass) defined as the density of substance which mass equal to one milligram occupies the volume one cubic deciliter or 100 cubic centimeters.
mg/hMilligram per HourA unit of mass flow rate equivalent to the rate at which one thousandth of a gram of matter crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to one hour.
mg/kgMilligram per KilogramA unit of a mass fraction expressed as a number of milligrams of substance per kilogram of mixture. The unit is also used as a dose calculation unit.
mg/kg/dMilligram per Kilogram per DayA dose calculation unit expressed in milligram(s) per kilogram per period of time equal to twenty-four hours.
mg/m2Milligram per Square MeterA metric unit of areal density equal to approximately 2.94935E-5 ounce per square yard. Also used as a dose calculation unit.
mg/m2/24.hMilligram per Square Meter per DayA dose calculation unit expressed in milligram(s) per square meter per period of time equal to twenty-four hours.
mg/m2/hMilligram per Square Meter per HourMilligram per Square Meter per Hour
mg/m2/wkMilligram per Square Meter per WeekA dose calculation unit expressed in milligram(s)per square meter per period of time equal to seven days.
mg/mLMilligram per MilliliterThe SI derived unit of mass concentration defined as the concentration of one kilogram of a substance in unit volume of the mixture equal to one cubic meter, or the concentration of one milligram of a substance in unit volume of the mixture equal to one milliliter, or one gram of a substance per one liter of the mixture. It is also a unit of mass density (volumic mass) defined as the density of substance which mass equal to one milligram occupies the volume one milliliter.
mg/wkMilligram per WeekA dose administration rate unit equal to the rate at which one thousandth of a gram of a product is delivered or administered over the time period of one week. This is also a unit of mass flow rate equivalent to the rate at which one thousandth of a gram of matter crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to one week.
mg/{inhalation}Milligram per InhalationAn inhalation dosing unit equal to the quantity of medicinal substance(s) expressed in milligrams delivered per a single act of taking in breath.
MHzMegahertzThe SI derived unit of frequency; equal to one million oscillations per second or to 10E6 hertz.
minMinuteA unit measure of time equal to 60 seconds.
mLMilliliterA measure of volume for a liquid. A milliliter is approximately 950 times smaller than a quart and 30 times smaller than a fluid ounce. A milliliter of liquid and a cubic centimeter (cc) of liquid are the same.
mL/hMilliliter per HourA metric unit of volumetric flow rate defined as the rate at which one milliliter of matter crosses a given surface during the period of time equal to one hour.
mL/kgMilliliter per KilogramA dose calculation unit equal to one milliliter of preparation per one kilogram of body mass.
mmolMillimoleA unit of amount of substance equal to 0.001 mole.
molMoleThe the basic unit of substance, one of the seven base units of the International System of Units (Systeme International d'Unites, SI). It is the amount of substance that contains as many elementary units as there are atoms in 0.012 kg of carbon-12. When the mole is used, the elementary entities must be specified and may be atoms, molecules, ions, electrons, other particles, or specified groups of such particles.
mosmMilliosmoleA unit of osmotic pressure equal to one thousandth of osmole or osmotic pressure of 0.001 molar solution of a substance that does not dissociate.
mUMilliunitA quantity equivalent to the one thousandth unit (10E-3 unit).
MUMillion UnitsA quantity equivalent to one million units (10E6 units).
mVMillivoltA SI derived unit of an electric potential and electromotive force equal to one thousandth of a volt.
m[iU]Milliinternational UnitA unit equal to one-thousandth of an international unit.
m[iU]/m2Milliinternational Unit per Square MeterA dose calculation unit equal to one-thousandth (10E-3) of an arbitrary unit of biological activity (International Unit) of substance per square meter of body surface area.
M[RAD]MegaradA unit of absorbed radiation dose equal to one million rad (10E6 rad), or 10000 Gy (10E4 Gy).
nCiNanocurieA unit of radioactivity equal to one billionth of a curie or 37 becquerels, and corresponding to radioactivity of 37 atomic disintegrations per second.
ngNanogramA metric unit of mass equal to 10E-9 gram, or one millionth of a milligram.
ng/kgNanogram per KilogramA unit of mass fraction expressed as a number of nanograms of a substance per kilogram of the mixture. The unit is also used as a dose calculation unit.
ng/LNanogram per LiterA unit of mass concentration defined as the concentration of one nanogram of a substance per one liter of the mixture, or one picogram of a substance per unit volume of the mixture equal to one milliliter, or one microgram of a substance per one cubic meter of the mixture. The concept also refers to the metric unit of mass density (volumic mass) defined as the density of a substance which mass equal to one nanogram occupies the volume of one liter.
ng/mLMicrogram per LiterA unit of mass concentration defined as the concentration of one microgram of a substance per unit volume of the mixture equal to one liter. The concept also refers to the unit of mass density (volumic mass) defined as the density of a substance which mass equal to one microgram occupies the volume of one liter.
nmolNanomoleA unit of amount of substance equal to 10E-9 mole.
nm{light}NanometerA metric unit of length equal to to one billionth of a meter (10E-9 meter). Nanometer is used as a unit for light wavelength measurement.
osmOsmoleA non-SI unit of osmotic pressure equal to that of an ideal solution of a nondissociating substance that has a concentration of one mole of solute per liter of solution.
PaPascalA SI derived unit of pressure equivalent to one newton per square meter or 10 bars or to 1.45x10E-4 pounds per square inch.
pgPicogramThe metric unit of mass equal to one trillionth of a gram (10E-12 gram).
sSecondThe second is the unit of time, one of the seven base units of the International System of Units (Systeme International d'Unites, SI). The second is the duration of 919 263 177 0 periods of the specified light radiation corresponding to the transition between the two hyperfine levels of the ground state of the caesium 133 atom in its ground state at 0 K. According to the convention, 60 seconds constitute one minute; 3,600 seconds constitute one hour. Abbreviation Sec. is acceptable in non-scientific usage only.
uDaltonA non-SI unit of mass equivalent of the weight of a hydrogen atom or one-sixteenth of mass of oxygen atom, or 1.657 x 10(e-24) grams.
U/gKilounit per KilogramAn arbitrary unit of substance content expressed in thousands of units of biological activity per unit of mass equal to one kilogram. Kilounit per kilogram is also used as a dose calculation unit expressed in thousands of arbitrary units per one kilogram of body mass.
U/kgUnit per KilogramAn arbitrary unit of substance content expressed in units of biological activity per unit of mass equal to one kilogram. Unit per kilogram is also used as a dose calculation unit expressed in arbitrary units per one kilogram of body mass.
U/m2Unit per Square MeterA dose calculation unit expressed as a number of arbitrary units of substance per one square meter of a body surface area.
uCiMicrocurieA unit of radioactivity equal to one millionth of a curie or 37 kilobecquerels, and corresponding to a radioactivity of 37 000 atomic disintegrations per second.
ugMicrogramA metric unit of mass equal to one millionth of a gram or one one thousandth of a milligram.
ug/cm2Microgram per Square CentimeterMicrogram per Square Centimeter
ug/hMicrogram per HourA unit of mass flow rate equivalent to the rate at which one millionth of a gram of matter crosses a given surface or is delivered to a given object or space over a period of time equal to one hour.
ug/kgMicrogram per KilogramA unit of a mass fraction expressed as a number of micrograms of substance per kilogram of mixture. The unit is also used as a dose calculation unit.
ug/kg/24.hMicrogram per Kilogram per DayA dose calculation unit expressed in microgram(s) per kilogram per period of time equal to twenty-four hours.
ug/kg/wkMicrogram per Kilogram per WeekA dose administration rate unit where the amount of product to be delivered or administered is calculated in micrograms as a function of the subject's weight in kilograms and is delivered or administered over the time period of one week.
ug/m2Microgram per Square MeterA metric unit of areal density equal to approximately 2.94935E-8 ounce per square yard. Also used as a dose calculation unit.
ug/m2/hMicrogram per Square Meter per HourA dose calculation unit expressed in microgram(s) per square meter per period of time equal to sixty minutes.
uLMicroliterA metric unit of volume equal to one millionth of a liter or one one thousandth of a milliliter.
umolMicromoleA unit of amount of substance equal to a millionth of a mole.
[drp]Metric DropA unit of volume used in pharmacy and equal to 0.05 milliliter (20 drops/ml).
[gal_us]Gallon USThe US unit of liquid volume legally defined as 3785.411784 milliliters (3.785 411 784 liters), or 231 cubic inches. The US gallon holds 4 liquid quarts; the gallon of water gallon weighs approximately 8.33 pounds.
[iU]International UnitThe unitage assigned by the WHO to International Biological Standards - substances, classed as biological according to the criteria provided by WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization (e.g. hormones, enzymes, and vaccines), to enable the results of biological and immunological assay procedures to be expressed in the same way throughout the world. The definition of an international unit is generally arbitrary and technical, and has to be officially approved by the International Conference for Unification of Formulae.
[iU]/kgInternational Unit per KilogramAn arbitrary unit of substance content expressed in international units of biological activity per one kilogram of mass of the system. It is also used as a dose calculation unit expressed in international units of biological activity per one kilogram of body mass.
[iU]/LInternational Unit per LiterUnit of arbitrary substance concentration (biologic activity concentration) defined as the concentration of one international unit per one liter of the system volume.
[iU]/mgInternational Unit per MilligramUnit of arbitrary substance concentration (biologic activity concentration) defined as the concentration of one international unit per one milligram of substance.
[iU]/mg{alpha-Tocopherol}International Unit per Milligram of Alpha-TocopherolUnit of arbitrary substance concentration (biologic activity concentration) defined as the concentration of one international unit of alpha-Tocopherol per one milligram of preparation.
[iU]{Vitamin A}International Unit of Vitamin AAn arbitrary unit of measurement of the specific biological activity of vitamin A, defined by the International Conference for Unification of Formula as equal approximately to 0.30 micrograms of all-trans retinol or to 0.60 micrograms of the provitamin A, all-trans-beta-carotene.
[oz_av]OunceThe traditional unit of mass. The avoirdupois ounce is equal to 1/16 pound, or 28.3495 grams, or 0.911 457 troy ounce.
[psi]Pound per Square InchA traditional unit of pressure equivalent to 6.894757 kilopascals, or 703.0696 kilograms per square meter, or 51.71507 millimeters of mercury.
[RAD]RadA unit of radiation absorbed dose equal to the amount of energy from any type of ionizing radiation (e.g., alpha, beta, gamma, neutrons, etc.) deposited in any medium (e.g., water, tissue, air). A dose of one rad means the absorption of 100 ergs (a small but measurable amount of energy) per gram of absorbing tissue (100 rad = 1 gray). (NRC)
[tbs_us]Tablespoon Dosing UnitA unit of volume informally used in pharmacy. Under the metric system the tablespoon has been standardized at 15 milliliters in the US, Britain, Canada, and New Zealand, and at 20 milliliters in Australia and some European countries.
[tsp_us]Teaspoon Dosing UnitA unit of volume used in pharmacy and equal to 5 milliliters.
{Application}ApplicationApplication; the work of applying something.
{AUC}Area under CurveThe area between the x-axis and the curve given by the integrand. It is equal to the definite integral of a function. In the field of pharmacokinetics, the area under the curve (AUC) is the area under the curve in a plot of concentration of a drug in plasma against time. AUC is usually given for the time interval zero to infinity, and other time intervals are indicated.
{Bottle}Bottle Dosing UnitA dosing unit that contains medicinal substance(s) in the form of a receptacle with a narrow neck designed to accept a specific closure.
{Caplet}Caplet Dosing UnitA dosing unit that contains medicinal substances in the form similar to a tablet enclosed within a tamper-resistant soluble container usually made from a suitable form of gelatin.
{Capsule}Capsule Dosing UnitA dosing unit that contains medicinal substance(s) enclosed within a soft or hard shell, usually made from gelatin, starch, or cellulose, or other suitable material.
{Cells}CellThe smallest units of living structure capable of independent existence, composed of a membrane-enclosed mass of protoplasm and containing a nucleus or nucleoid. Cells are highly variable and specialized in both structure and function, though all must at some stage replicate proteins and nucleic acids, utilize energy, and reproduce themselves.
{Course}CourseA period of protocol-prescribed activity or intervention.
{Course}CycleAn event or sequence of events that constitute round or succession of observable phenomena, recurring usually at regular or approximately regular time intervals and in the same sequence.
{Dose}DoseThe amount of medicine taken, or radiation given, at one time.
{Inhalation}Inhalation Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of the medicinal substance(s) delivered via the respiratory tract by one oral or nasal inhalation in the form of a gas, aerosol, mist, liquid, or fine powder using a nebulizer or an aerosol device, or the force of natural breath.
{IV Bag}Intravenous Bag Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in a portable container for packaging pharmaceutical dosage forms intended for administration through an intravenous delivery system.
{Measure}MeasurementMeasurement; the size or magnitude of something.
{No Scre}Data Not AvailableData from an original source is not present, accessible or ready for use or service.
{packet}Packet Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in a single item of a packet dosage form.
{Patch}Patch Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in a single item of a patch drug delivery system which often has an adhesive backing that is applied to an external site on the body.
{pfu}Plaque Forming UnitA measure of viable infectious entities (e.g. viral particles or group of particles) in the specimen or product defined as the smallest quantity that can produce a cytopathic effect in the host cell culture challenged with the defined inoculum, visible under the microscope and/or to the naked eye as a plaque. A number of plaque forming units (PFU) per unit volume is a conventional way to refer the titer of an infective entity in a specimen or preparation.
{puff}Puff Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to a metered dose of medicinal substance(s) that is delivered in uniform quantity upon each activation of a medical device (e.g. an inhaler), in which the dosage form is contained.
{RAE}Retinol Activity EquivalentAn arbitrary unit for measurement of the bioefficacy of ingested provitamin A carotenoids introduced by the U.S. Institute of Medicine (IOM). For a given amount of provitamin A compounds in a mixed diet, IOM estimates that the number of retinol activity e (RAE) is half the number of RE suggested by FAO/WHO. RAE is viewed as an approximate guideline because it was defined on the basis of relatively few studies and limited data on carotenoids bioavailability and bioconversion.
{RE}Retinol EquivalentAn arbitrary unit for measurement of a vitamin A activity of provitamin A carotenoids (such as carotenes, xanthophylls, and compounds that arise from rearrangement of carotene I skeleton) in a mixed diet introduced by FAO/WHO Expert Group in 1967. The concept of the retinol equivalent (RE) is established on the following relationships among food sources of the vitamin A: one microgram of all-trans retinol is equal to one RE, one microgram of beta-carotene is equal to 0.167 RE, and one microgram of other pro-vitamin A carotenoids is equal to 0.084 RE.
{Seed}Radioactive Seed Implant Dosing UnitA dosing unit in a form of an incapsulated radioactive material that constitutes an implantable pellet designed for brachytherapy administration.
{Session}SessionTime, period, or term devoted to some activity.
{Spray}Spray Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in the volume of liquid delivered by the single operation of a spray dosage form container.
{Suppository}Suppository Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in a single item of a suppository dosage form that is designed for introduction into the orifice of the human body and usually melts, softens, or dissolves at body temperature.
{tbl}Tablet Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in a single item of a tablet dosage form comprising of compressed medicinal substance(s) with or without suitable diluents.
{TCID50}Tissue Culture Infection Dose 50A quantity of a pathogen required to infect 50% of the tissue cultures inoculated.
{Troche}Troche Dosing UnitA dosing unit equal to the amount of medicinal substance(s) contained in a single item of a discoid-shaped solid oral dosage form containing the medicinal agent in a suitably flavored base.
{Unit}UnitAny division of quantity accepted as a standard of measurement or exchange.
{Unknown}UnknownNot known, not observed, not recorded, or refused.
{VP}Viral Particle UnitA unit for virus amount measurement that represents the total number of viral particles (live and dead combined).
{Wafer}Wafer Dosage FormA thin slice of material containing a medicinal agent.
{YU}Yeast UnitsA natural number greater than 9 and less than 11 and the quantity that it denotes: the sum of nine and one.: A natural number following 999999 and preceding 100001 and the quantity that it denotes: one thousand thousand.: Various single-celled members of the fungal families, ascomycetes, basidiomycetes and imperfect fungi that tend to be unicellular for the greater part of their life cycle.
Is the patient taking any concomitant medicationsConcomitant Medication Use Ind-321799861.0CHARACTER
YesYesThe affirmative response to a question or activity.
NoNoThe non-affirmative response to a question.
UnknownUnknownNot known, not observed, not recorded, or refused.
UseConcomitant Medication Form Data Collection Use Reason34376571.0CHARACTER
Cumulative at end of therapyCumulative at completion of therapyAn action or administration of therapeutic agents to produce an effect that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.: To possess every necessary or normal part or component or step; having come or been brought to a conclusion.: Increasing by successive addition.
During each protocol treatment administrationEach therapy administrationUsed to refer to every member of a group of people or things, considered individually.: An action or administration of therapeutic agents to produce an effect that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.: The act of administration.
Specific therapy cycleSpecific therapy cycleSpecified; clearly and explicitly stated.: An action or administration of therapeutic agents to produce an effect that is intended to alter the course of a pathologic process.: An event or sequence of events that constitute round or succession of observable phenomena, recurring usually at regular or approximately regular time intervals and in the same sequence.